Per Capita Consumption 2013
Country-specific analysis 2005-2012

Including trade, natural and man-made fibre output, spunbonds, cotton inventory changes and worn clothing trade

As generally accepted major factors for future textile consumption, population growth and disposable income will be subject to significant change.

A slowdown in both variables is expected for countries and regions currently with above-average textile demand.

Moreover, the often underestimated and neglected volume of used clothing and articles (more than 4m tonnes at present) should be considered in assessing future textile demand as it represents the majority of textile consumption in a number of countries.

This new study from The Fiber Year analyses 115 countries and shows national per capita consumption for the period 2005-2012, including a forecast for 2020.

Single chapters on the various regions can also be purchased; please contact us for further details.

Publication date October 2013

Available in PDF format only

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Full Product Description

This new statistical report complements the annual publication The Fiber Year and provides more detailed data for the textile and clothing consumption in 115 countries. This analysis is essential as population growth and disposable incomes, which are both generally accepted as major factors for future textile demand, will be subject to decisive changes.

A slowdown in both variables is expected for countries and regions currently with above-average textile demand.

Of course, other factors have an impact on textile consumption and need to be considered, estimated and calculated; these include such aspects as raw material availability, spirit of the time, shortening fashion cycles, climate change, regional weather conditions, sustainability and recycling.

It goes without saying that increased government spending for infrastructure and mobility will also affect future consumption; for example, rising consumer demand for hygiene and medical articles owing to higher incomes and changing consumer behaviour. Such “soft” factors necessitate a specific adjustment to local circumstances.

Understanding the history of textile dynamics is a basic prerequisite to drawing conclusions for future development. Expressed in simple terms, the local availability of fibre and yarn volumes together with trade flows may result in the desired size.

Unfortunately, trade figures often are inconsistent. For that reason, more than 3,000 trade chapters on four-digit level have been analysed by unit values. In case of missing quantities or dubious figures, estimates have been included based on regional comparisons.

In addition, the often underestimated and neglected volume of used clothing and articles (more than 4m tonnes at present) should be considered in assessing future textile demand as it represents the majority of textile consumption in a number of countries.

Second-hand clothing is widespread in Africa and helps people in low-income countries to save money. On the other hand, it is a risk for the struggling textile industry. In Kenya, for example, buying used clothing is called “mitumba” and is quite popular. More than a third of the annual consumption has been met by mitumba.

Although the consumption level of some countries, in particular in the Asian region, is surprisingly high, any necessary adjustments have not been made. A plausible explanation for this size may arises from numerous complaints worldwide about unofficial trade for which there is no statistical information available.

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£950.00 GBP

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